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Cumulus (6)

Friday, 16 March 2018 15:16

Partnership with Cumulus

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We are delighted to announce a partnership with Cumulus, the global association which serves art and design education and research. It is a forum for partnership and transfer of knowledge and best practices. Cumulus consists currently of 257 members from 54 countries. The secretariat is located in Helsinki in Finland.
Cumulus aims at building and maintaining a dynamic and flexible academic forum which brings together top level educational institutions from all parts of the world. Cumulus collaborates not only with institutions and organizations from the field of art, design and media; the encouragement of co-operation with industry and business is important as well.
To stimulate design actions, projects and research leading to a more sustainable society, Cumulus representatives signed the Kyoto Design Declaration in March 2008. To implement the ideals of the Declaration, the Cumulus Green award was established. Cumulus Green is an international award focused on cultivating and leading global cultures, societies and industries towards more ecological and responsible solutions.
in this place logo RGBFollowing our Co-Editor’s involvement with In This Place, the Cumulus conference at Nottingham Trent University (UK) in 2016 and the review published by Sally Bassett in this journal, we met with Cumulus last year and agreed that we will work together over the coming few years. We will publish abstracts/papers from the next few bi-annual conferences. Given that there were five prize papers from the Nottingham conference we thought we would start with those and the abstracts below have links to the main conference report.
For members of Cumulus we have agreed special publication rates which you can find out either by emailing the Editors at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  when you have something you’d like to publish and letting us know you are a Cumulus member or by contacting Eija Salmi at the University of Aalto secretariat. The secretariat will also be publicising our partnership through the Cumulus online newsletter.

Wednesday, 24 January 2018 06:00

Work on the Move

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Abstract

‘Work on the move’ is a design, process-driven methodology, which uses multiple locations within an outdoor setting and movement between locations, all of which function as learning places, confined to a specified time period.

Between 2012 and 2015, a team of international Higher Education product design educators (all members of Carousel, a co-operation of Erasmus members in Zwolle, Edinburgh, Nantes, Rome, Kortrijk and Oslo), industry professionals and product design students developed and tested four case studies. Each case study was conducted in a different international location and was constructed with a different focus, to help define and refine a definitive working methodology.

‘Work on the move’ explores the influence of ‘place’ upon design, in terms of the impact it has on productivity and creative problem-solving, when working away from the traditional studio/office-based environment. It also explores the significance of shared place, when working directly with a client in situ, and experiencing the place-based influences upon their businesses. While identifying location as part of the design process, the study also seeks to understand the effects of time restriction and working in transit upon creativity and productivity, within the context of specific projects.

Keywords

Place, Nomadic, Collaboration, International

Authors

Richard Firth and Trent Jennings and Ruth Cochrane, Edinburgh Napier University (UK), Michael Taks and Peter van de Graaf, Windesheim University of Applied Science, Zwolle (Netherlands)

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Abstract

This article explores the relationship between design, imagination, senses, places and objects. It was based on Richard Holmes' theoretical concepts, particularly on the period designated "Age of Wonder", Robert Silverman and Thomas Hankins theories on "Instruments and the Imagination" about the parallel of imagination and the real world, the ideas of Juhani Pallasmaa on senses and architecture, and the Design Fiction theories of Stuart Candy. A conceptual survey of the correlation between imagination and the senses makes us wonder how objects/spaces present themselves to men and how men perceive them. Which senses rules this communication? We examine the relevance of senses and imagination on the creation of artifacts and surroundings, in order to build a more intimate relationship between them. To explore this connection we developed the "Wonder Cards" card game focused on the development of ideas, objects and surroundings that stimulate senses and imagination. We are testing the game on Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and workshops to analyze and understand the use of these elements in design projects where emotion and wonder is the key factor.

Keywords

Design, Imagination, Innovation, Methodology

Authors

Rian Rezende - Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro - PUC-Rio (Brazil)

Sabrina Araújo - Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro - PUC-Rio (Brazil)

Denise Portinari - Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro - PUC-Rio (Brazil)

 

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Abstract

Finding solutions to the social issues in rural communities has aroused strong academic interest of varied disciplines, including the design field. This paper seeks to explore the potential of rural crafts in promoting community empowerment through participatory design intervention based on a case study of a project concerning the Huayao Ethnic Minority community in China. Firstly, the research background was explained including the relevant theories of the prestigious scholars in both Western countries and East Asia, and the research methodology. Then, the knowledge of local assets was gained mainly through field survey. Next, the technique tiaohua, one type of local cross-stitching, was chosen for participatory design experiment. The participatory design process based on the technique of tiaohua is a reiterative cycle and each cycle includes five stages: Knowledge Acquisition, Concept Generation, Preliminary Prototyping, Motif Design and Final Prototyping. The authors went further to explain the co-design process through an analysis of the design works. Finally, the authors summarized the paradigm of utilizing rural crafts for promoting community empowerment through participatory design intervention. Moreover, the limitations of this paper were pointed out and future research plans were proposed.

Keywords

Ethnic minority, rural crafts, community empowerment, participatory design

Authors

Baosheng Wang, School of Design, Hunan University (China)

Tie Ji, School of Design, Hunan University (China)

Yuanyuan Yang, School of Design, Hunan University (China)

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Abstract

Through this paper, we present our analysis of the social function of public art. As a form of theoretical research, we consider various perspectives on what different works of art do in societies. We believe that public art is a form of education related to the sustainability of cultures. When groups erect works of public art in their communities, they are typically created with lasting materials to enable that group to project their ideas and beliefs to future citizens. The question of which people or events within the history of a society should be monumentalized is controversial as Levinson (1998) noted.

Keywords

Public art, theoretical inquiry, social aspects of art

Authors

Melanie L. Buffington Virginia Commonwealth University (USA)

Supriya Manandhar Virginia Commonwealth University (USA)

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Thursday, 18 January 2018 06:00

A Never Ending Project into Future Design Spaces

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Abstract

The Never Ending Project is an international collaboration between ESAG Penninghen, Paris, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, and the School of Visual Arts Interior Design (SVAID), New York. The project was initiated in Paris, June 2014. The 2015 brief invited interior design/architecture students from the three universities to design a drone docking and control station. This paper will explore how this project offered an insight on innovative future spaces for design education and practice through the: creativity of the brief, dynamic teamwork of the international collaborators, and using various technologies to effectively communicate and transfer design ideas between continents. The difference in time zones between Melbourne, Paris and New York allowed the students to work on the project twenty-four hours a day from the 14th-20th of September 2015. The design travelled sequentially from Melbourne to Paris, then New York and the process continued the following day for six days. Every time the design reached a new destination it was adapted according to each of the university’s site restrictions, respecting the differences in the design cultural identities. Innovative educational and technological practices sustained this design process and successfully expanded this six-day intensive design studio beyond the physical walls of traditional design spaces and practices to offer a glimpse of future design environments.

Keywords

Future design learning spaces, drone technology, global design studio, technology and education, twenty-four hour project

Authors

Dolly Daou - Swinburne University of Technology (Australia)

Eduardo Lytton - School of Visual Arts (USA)

Gérard Vallin, Gilles Poplin, Jean Le Lay, Pelayo Bustillo Macias and Pierre-Yvon Carnoy ESAG-Penninghen (France)

Jane Smith - School of Visual Arts (USA)

 

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