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Wednesday, 24 January 2018 06:00

Work on the Move

Abstract

‘Work on the move’ is a design, process-driven methodology, which uses multiple locations within an outdoor setting and movement between locations, all of which function as learning places, confined to a specified time period.

Between 2012 and 2015, a team of international Higher Education product design educators (all members of Carousel, a co-operation of Erasmus members in Zwolle, Edinburgh, Nantes, Rome, Kortrijk and Oslo), industry professionals and product design students developed and tested four case studies. Each case study was conducted in a different international location and was constructed with a different focus, to help define and refine a definitive working methodology.

‘Work on the move’ explores the influence of ‘place’ upon design, in terms of the impact it has on productivity and creative problem-solving, when working away from the traditional studio/office-based environment. It also explores the significance of shared place, when working directly with a client in situ, and experiencing the place-based influences upon their businesses. While identifying location as part of the design process, the study also seeks to understand the effects of time restriction and working in transit upon creativity and productivity, within the context of specific projects.

Keywords

Place, Nomadic, Collaboration, International

Authors

Richard Firth and Trent Jennings and Ruth Cochrane, Edinburgh Napier University (UK), Michael Taks and Peter van de Graaf, Windesheim University of Applied Science, Zwolle (Netherlands)

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Published in Cumulus
Thursday, 05 May 2016 14:23

Guest Editor - Prof Ana Constantin PhD

Professor Emeritus, Ana Constantin PhD, is a former Professor in the Department of Psychology in the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, The ‘Alexandru Ioan Cuza’ University, Iași, Romania. Her first love has been, for years, the study and teaching of creativity, with its psychological and educational implications. Her second main area of interest is conflict resolution. She still teaches classes for undergraduate students and her main efforts are focused on encouraging former young Fellows and her doctoral students to undertake research in creativity and to publish studies in highly appreciated journals.

From October 14 -17, 2014 the Acre 20 International Creativity Conference will be held at Bela Bela, South Africa. This annual event, started by Dr Kobus Neethling 20 years ago, will feature presenters and workshop leaders from all over the world.

Kobus was one of the keynote presenters at our own international Creativity & Cultural Diversity conference organised by Caroline Fryer Bolingbroke some years ago. At that event, Kobus emphasised the importance of strategic creativity in today's world which he saw as characterised by unselfishness, caring and compassion, but also wealth creation. He stressed the need to use such wealth to ensure a healthy people and a healthy planet. It was up to us, he argued, to decide if that was the kind of world we wanted to live in and, if so, this meant that we had to think very carefully about how we chose to use our creativity.

For more information about the Acre 20 conference, you can email Ena: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  but please do so quickly as this event is already heavily subscribed.

Published in News and Events
Wednesday, 02 April 2014 13:05

Margriet Leemhuis

Power is often vested in those that are in the elite group within a profession. It is recognised that in most professions, whether at a senior executive level or at board level, it is harder for women to reach the top. There are a host of factors for this which have been well covered by others and the Cultural and Creative industries are no exception. Of course influence can be exerted by reaching a high level, but the beauty of influence is that it does not depend on Power, even though it can be powerful, and it can emerge from any part of the creative and cultural ecology. We wanted to provide a platform for some of those women who have for a variety of reasons established themselves as thought leaders, opinion formers, exceptionally creative or entrepreneurial and through their activity have become influential. Sometimes they have been gutsy or provocative and sometimes they have just gone about their business in a confident, steady and assertive manner. They have all managed to attract a degree of attention, so here are some of those who have caught ours.

This time we profile Margriet Leemhuis, Deputy Head of Mission at the Royal Netherlands Embassy in London.

Published in Women of Influence
Tuesday, 16 April 2013 23:28

What's your problem?!?

We're launching our Creativity Live project and we need YOUR problems to solve!

We are looking for some real life problems to solve and we would love to hear your ideas. Much as we'd all love world peace or an end to global warming, we need to identify problems that have Problem Owners - ie. someone who can take our ideas and actually put them into practice.

So if you would like creative people from around the world work on your problem or challenge - or if you know someone who might need our help, please post your ideas on the Creativity Live page, or if you prefer, you can use our Facebook page, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tweet them to us @CreativityJourn. There's great potential here for us to work together to really help a person or community to solve a difficult challenge.

Vincent Nolan, an internationally recognised expert in the Synectics creative problem solving process, has generously offered to facilitate the process once we've identified a problem to solve. We're really looking forward to seeing your ideas!

PS. Thanks very much to those of you who submitted ideas in our first experiment - there were some great ideas and we'll definitely try them out!

Published in News and Events
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