ISSN 2050-5337 - ISSUE 6            Find us in EBSCOhost Academic Search Ultimate Collection

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Displaying items by tag: art

Abstract

This study offers a theoretical intervention model that shows how increasing self-compassion can be beneficial in the treatment of persons with suicidal behavior and which art therapy therapeutic factors help to do so. The study was directly focused on the target group of clients with suicidal behavior. However, the purpose of the study is not to generalize the target group, but to find the therapeutic factors of intervention for cultivating self-compassion and overcoming suicidality.

The intervention proposed in this article uses a three-step art therapy model for cultivating self-compassion and overcoming suicidality. The study was conducted with five suicidal people and consisted of eight individual 60-minute sessions once a week. Qualitative methods (semi-structured individual interviews) were used to identify therapeutic factors behind the art-therapy process.

Published in Health and Wellbeing

This article is based on a qualitative study that examines the creative experience of three women artists over the age of 70 to understand why art making is important to older adults and how it influences the aging process. Some guiding questions include: How do older women engage in making art? In what ways are the art making process and product important to them? How do developmental changes in old age impact the creative process?

Abstract

This article is based on a qualitative study that examines the creative experience of three women artists over the age of 70 to understand why art making is important to older adults and how it influences the aging process. Some guiding questions include: How do older women engage in making art? In what ways are the art making process and product important to them? How do developmental changes in old age impact the creative process? The study draws from literature discussing aging and human development (Atchley, 1999; Butler, 1963; Erikson, 1959; and Tornstam, 2005), creativity and aging (Cohen et al, 2006; Fisher & Specht, 1999; Lindauer et al, 1997; Reed, 2005; and Simonton, 1990a), and art therapy (Kerr, 1997). The study involved open-ended interviews of the three women and observing their participation in an open art studio group.

The findings indicate that gaining an identity as an artist is particularly important to these women in negotiating their aging process, along with motivation, connection and legacy. The creative experiences of these women reveal that the interrelation of art and aging influences emotional and physical processes, which are evident in the artwork and creative processes of these women. These findings have implications for understanding how creativity plays a role in the aging process of older adults and for the design of therapeutic arts programmes for older adults.

Keywords: creativity, aging, art, identity

Published in Health and Wellbeing
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