ISSN 2050-5337 - ISSUE 4

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Thursday, 05 February 2015 09:09

The Real Creativity Crisis

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There are many benefits to modern technology, but there are drawbacks as well, and several of these have a direct impact on creative potential. Because so many people use the internet, and in particular social media, any negative effects of internet usage are wide-ranging and profound. They could certainly be considered indicative of a crisis. Just to name one indication that the magnitude of the problem deserves to be called a crisis, early in 2013 over 604 million people were using Facebook - and that is just one of several social media. Hence, if social media inhibit creativity, the problem is a big one. The present article describes how social media and networks might inhibit creativity and identifies the types of individuals who are most likely to suffer. It concludes with a brief discussion of methods for immunizing against the inhibitive effects. Perhaps the crisis can be avoided, or at least mitigated, and the creativity crisis averted.

Abstract

There are many benefits to modern technology, but there are drawbacks as well, and several of these have a direct impact on creative potential. Because so many people use the internet, and in particular social media, any negative effects of internet usage are wide-ranging and profound. They could certainly be considered indicative of a crisis. Just to name one indication that the magnitude of the problem deserves to be called a crisis, early in 2013 over 604 million people were using Facebook - and that is just one of several social media. Hence, if social media inhibit creativity, the problem is a big one. The present article describes how social media and networks might inhibit creativity and identifies the types of individuals who are most likely to suffer. It concludes with a brief discussion of methods for immunizing against the inhibitive effects. Perhaps the crisis can be avoided, or at least mitigated, and the creativity crisis averted.

Keywords: Creativity crisis, social media, networks, innovation, intrinsic motivation, autonomy


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Dr Mark Runco

Mark Runco earned his PhD in Cognitive Psychology from the Claremont Graduate School. His research has focused on creativity since that time. Dr. Runco is the Founding Editor of the Creativity Research Journal and co-edited the Encyclopedia of Creativity in 1999 and 2011. He is currently the E. Paul Torrance Professor of Creativity and Gifted Education at the University of Georgia. In 2010 he published the rCAB, a comprehensive battery of tests for the assessment of creativity. Dr. Runco is a Past President of Division 10 (Psychology, Art, Creativity, and Aesthetics) of the American Psychological Association. His textbook, Creativity: Theories, themes, and issues (Academic Press) has been translated into six languages. The revision of that textbook, and his new volume, The New Science of Creativity, are due out in 2013.

1 comment

  • Comment Link Denise SalmonMonday, 30 May 2016 19:53 posted by Denise Salmon

    A very interesting article, I didn't think of the effects of social media like that before.

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