ISSN 2050-5337 - ISSUE 4

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  • We are delighted to showcase a series of articles by our esteemed Japanese colleagues which provide a valuable insight into creativity development in Japan, guest edited by Emeritus Professor Dr Kenichi Yumino. This includes a fascinating account of creativity at the Sony Corporation, how to rapidly generate a wealth of creative ideas, the role played by serendipity in creativity, and actions currently being taken to augment creative production in the Japanese workplace, higher education and in Japanese schools. Complementing this series, is an article on the popular Japanese KJ Ho (method) of creative problem solving by Professor Dr Toshio Nomura and we thank him and the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation (GBSF) for supporting this special series of articles. You may also be interested in a related article by artist, Alexander Devereux, whose recent visit to Japan is inspiring his work.Our links with Japanese creativity experts began in 2000 when I was commissioned by a government body to review creativity development programmes internationally, with a special emphasis on certain countries including Japan. This led me to our guest editor, Professor Kenichi Yumino. Since then our links have been strengthened through our collaborations and research visits between our two countries which are continuing today. It has been a most valuable experience for us to learn about Japanese creativity development and to experience this at first hand.
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  • Dr Kenichi Yumino is an Emeritus Professor at Shizuoka University, Japan and the former President of the Japan Creativity Society. In high-school and college, he studied Electricity & Computer Science and proceeded to a doctoral course of Educational Psychology at Kyusyu University. His current interests are creative problem solving, how to foster pupils’ creativity in school, creativity training for pre-service teachers, and the use of praise words for encouraging creative attitudes and behaviours. Of his own publications, the one that he most values is 'Creativity Education in the World', published in 2005, which includes creativity education in the United States, Canada, the UK, Germany, Finland, China, Taiwan and Japan.
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  • This article provides a fascinating insight into the significant role played by creativity development in the success of Sony. The authors’ account of the ‘Ibuka Way’, developed by Masaru Ibuka, the founder of Sony, provides valuable learning for all managers who are wondering how to embed creativity in their organisations.
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  • Do you find it difficult to generate creative ideas? If so, this article is for you. In this paper Dr Takeo Higuchi, who established the Idea Marathon System (IMS) describes how you can use this process to significantly increase the number of ideas you can generate.
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  • Does chance favour the mind prepared for the unexpected? And might this lead to more creative solutions?
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  • This issue has long been the focus of debate in educational circles. In this paper Professor Yumino addresses this issue with particular reference to Japanese education today. He illustrates his argument with a series of lesson plan examples.
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  • As these authors point out, creativity development is not new in Japan but it is being increasingly regarded as essential in education and training. Yet there appears to be a problem in that many people still find it difficult to exercise their creativity in practice. This is what the authors address.
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  • The KJ Ho (Method) is a creative thinking and problem solving methodology, which was originally invented by Japanese cultural anthropologist, Professor Jiro Kawakita (1920-2009) and is popular in many Japanese organisations.
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  • This article highlights the importance of ensuring that any interventions aimed at increasing creativity are appropriate to the culture concerned.
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Traditions and technologies

These three articles, in their different ways, challenge us to consider the relative value of old and new traditions and technologies
and what we can learn from them to help us create a better future.

  • Japan- Theatre, respect, permanence and contradictions

    by Alexander Devereux Read More
  • Changing how we interact with the printed word

    by Diane Kessenich Read More
  • The real creativity crisis

    by Mark Runco Read More
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Welcome to Creativity & Human Development. This is not your average academic journal. We bring together peer-reviewed academic papers and feature articles in an exciting magazine style journal which breaks the boundaries of tradition. Some articles are free to read, for others you will need to subscribe. This is free and easy for individuals. If you are a student or lecturer, please ask your university to subscribe. All income supports this independent, non-profit journal.

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